While I was struggling with the creative rut I was in for a while, I kept enjoying making art. Because after all these years it has become a habit. It’s the kind of rewarding habit that anyone can create.

Even if you don’t have much time, if you have no ideas or feel like you’re un-creative, you can make art, you just have to:

Make it easy on yourself

Choose simple tools and carry them with you so that when you have a moment to spare, you can just pick them up and go, without needing to set-up an easel or anything, or deciding what tool you use. I always have at least a pen at hand, and a small watercolor box. Even though I was quite hungry, I still made this drawing, before starting to cook these ingredients. Very satisfying. And they tasted even better!
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Figure out what you’re most interested in.
If it’s drawing people, make sure you can! If you don’t have family or friends around that you can draw, watch life drawing sessions on YouTube and practice your skills.
It may be drawing portraits – make sure you have a mirror close by so you can practice drawing your own face, or use photos from TV, a magazine, or internet. There’s even an app with photo references for drawing portraits: Sktchy.

Don’t worry if drawing your subject is meaningful or not
Draw random things around the house. Don’t think about whether it’s meaningful or not – it’s meaningful because you draw it. Not the other way around. It’s part of your life so it belongs in your art journal.

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My go-tos are selfies, and drawing food. Sometimes I use small snippets of time throughout the day to draw what I eat, and by the end of the day, I filled a whole page!

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